Getting More Immersed with Indiewire


  The Penske Media purchase of Indiewire has resulted in an expansion of my role as crafts and awards season contributor.  Beginning this week, I begin Emmy coverage of below-the-line contenders along with my usual Oscar season crafts reporting, working closely

Immersed in Blu-ray: Hitchcock and Bogart


The WB Archive Collection gets Hitch and Bogie on Blu-ray and they've never looked better for home viewing. In Kent Jones' indispensable doc, Hitchcock/Truffaut, he reminds us that Truffaut was on a mission to correct misconceptions about Hitch as a lightweight

Immersed in Books: Farber on Film


For the first time, the complete writings of film critic Manny Farber is available from Library of America, edited by Robert Polito (Savage Art: A Biography of Jim Thompson). Manny Farber (1917-2008) was the first modernist film critic to write like a modernist.

performance capture

Tintin Gets the Mistika Treatment

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Movies, performance capture, Tech, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

SGO’s Mistika technology was used by Wellington-based Park Road Post on Steven Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin. All digital intermediate work in both 2-D and 3-D was achieved using Mistika, which included color grading, conforming, convergence adjustments, and hand-offs between shots.

In fact, the filmmakers were able to offer approvals remotely. Mistika’s role was an important one, as speed was a crucial factor in making the approval process work fluidly, no matter where the film-makers were in the world. The ability to output ongoing and work-in-progress (WIP’s) versions of the film easily and quickly, without actually slowing or stalling the DI process, was key.

Park Road head of picture and senior colorist, David Hollingsworth, explains: “The open structure of the Mistika platform, the speed of its toolset and SAN-based workflow meant that we could be working on shots as soon as they were handed over from Weta Digital and have the 2-D and 3-D grades working concurrently. The flexibility of the system also meant that I could be grading while senior online editor, Rob Gordon, could be conforming new shots into to the cut, and at the same time, stereoscopic artist, Meetal Gokul, could continue the convergence hand-offs and other stereo work. All of this happened as we were outputting WIP’s for the director’s approval overseas.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3w_ICK4us&feature=player_embedded#!

Spielberg Talks Tintin, War Horse

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

On the heels of my TOH interview with Steven Spielberg, here’s the full transcript about our discussion of The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse:

What has been like using this new performance capture technique for animation?

Tintin is only a new kind of animated movie if you immediately erase from existence Avatar and Polar Express and Beowulf and Christmas Carol because Bob Zemeckis and James Cameron set a precedent and raised a bar quite high. Tintin is the beneficiary of some amazing groundwork that has already been accomplished by two great artists, Zemeckis and Cameron, and we actually got to use every animator that worked on Avatar and moved right over to do Tintin. So I was in the crow’s nest and didn’t want to blow this opportunity to make a movie that was in the right medium for the right message.

What do you say to those who wonder why you didn’t use live actors with virtual environments?

If you have any familiarity with the Tintin books, you’ll see that they were the style guide for every single pose and every single facial expression, and everything that these characters look like in our movie is actually what they look like in the comic books. But if you’re not familiar with the Tintin books, just know that it brings you into a photorealistic world of animation and imagination.

Had I made it live action, here’s what people would be saying right now: ‘I hated all that makeup on those actors’ faces!’ Why’d he have to give him big, fake noses and big, fake ears and fake chins?’ You know, I would’ve been criticized for stylizing the movie beyond recognition and that’s why I chose this medium.

Was that fantastic motorcycle chase in Morocco, where you stage it all in one take, something you’ve always wanted to do?

No, I wanted to do this chase in one shot. I began working with the animators at Weta and we started with some previs, and I said, let’s do this entire chase in one shot, and I laid the whole thing out with the animators in one shot. I knew they could do it: I had to make sure it wasn’t going to be boring; I had to make sure it wasn’t going to need cuts and close-ups and so I was able to bring the characters in and out of their close-ups without interrupting the flow of the sequence. And once I saw it in a very rough version, the previsualization, I knew we could do the entire thing in one shot.

That alone is proof of the form that you chose.

Yeah, the form allowed me virtual freedom I’ve not had up until Tintin in my career, and the virtual freedom to put anything in my imagination up on the screen with only taste holding me back from becoming a complete hog, so to speak.

And the ability to go in and make last-minute lighting changes right up until the international release. What kind of changes did you make?

Sometimes I would convert a very bright, sunlit sequence to a very dark, film noir sequence, and we could do that in one phone conversation with the animators.

And Raiders found its way in there too.

I tried to keep the movie honest to the source material. I knew there would be some Raiders analogies because we sort of put the idea in the mind of the media when I first began telling people that I first came across Tintin when I read a Raiders of the Lost Ark review in one of the French magazines and it compared me to something called Tintin. And that’s when I discovered what Tintin was — I had never heard of Tintin before. And also the genre of the adventure movie has to follow certain principles, and those principles are the same for Gunga Din, the same for The Great Escape, the same for the Indiana Jones series, and the person that beat all of us to the punch in 1929 was Hergé.

Switching to War Horse, what was significant about it for you?

The reason I made the movie, beyond the fact that the play moved me so deeply when I saw it in the West End of London, was that here we have an animal that brings human beings together, at least in a détente of sorts, and the idea that an animal has the power to be able to bring these two warring sides together for a brief respite.

While I was watching it, I couldn’t help thinking that it was the opposite of Jaws, where you’ve got an unstoppable animal that unites people rather than destroys them.

(Laughing) Yeah, exactly, that’s a good observation on your part. And I also felt that it was very, very important to show the lengths to which a young man will travel in order to retrieve an animal that has meant so much to him and his family, that has basically saved the lives of his family by saving their farm, and that there had to be a happy conclusion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3w_ICK4us&feature=player_embedded#!

Letteri Talks Tintin and Apes

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Clips, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

In my latest TOH column at Indiewire, Weta’s Joe Letteri compares The Adventures of Tintin with Rise of the Planet of the Apes, overcoming the Uncanny Valley with authentic and detailed facial muscles, Weta’s new fur and lighting design, which altered performance as well. Spielberg, in fact, served as the film’s lighting consultant, switching to a film noir look for interiors. The new virtual camera’s ability to shoot on location with the other actors (along with these other refinements) will definitely improve Gollum’s performance in the new Hobbit film as well. You can listen to an audio Q&A with Letteri at the Autodesk Area site

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3w_ICK4us&feature=player_embedded#!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YyMqmDeoxI

Trailering The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Clips, Movies, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

The thrill, the chill, and the reverie are back when we return to Middle Earth in the first trailer from Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Dec. 14, 2012). It begins with a letter from the elder Bilbo Baggins (Ian Holm) to nephew Frodo (Elijah Wood) about his adventures as a young man, and we’re introduced to Martin Freeman as the younger Bilbo, who gets seduced into reclaiming the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the dragon Smaug; his encounter with 13 comic dwarfs until darkness sweeps upon the land.

Ian McKellen is prominent as the wizard Gandalf, in search of adventure and then later much more pensive. And we get glimpses not only of Frodo but also Galadriel (Cate Blanchett), too. Plus there’s the hint of danger with Goblins, Orcs, Wargs, and giant spiders. Oh, yes, it ends with a shot of Gollum (Andy Serkis looking as great as ever) muttering about his “precious.”

Spielberg Talks Tintin, War Horse

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Clips, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

In my latest TOH column for Indiewire, Spielberg tells me why he went performance capture with The Adventures of Tintin and the importance that War Horse holds for him. Later in the week, I will post my complete conversation with Spielberg.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3w_ICK4us&feature=player_embedded#!

Golden Globes Gets Animated

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Clips, Events, Movies, Music, Oscar, performance capture, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Grabbing Best Animated Feature nominations today for the 69th Golden Globe Awards are the five studio films you could count on: Steven Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin from Weta Digital (Dec. 21); Aardman/Sony’s Arthur Christmas; Pixar and John Lasseter’s Cars 2; DreamWorks’ Puss in Boots; and Gore Verbinski’s Rango, the front runner and ILM’s first animated feature. Gnomeo & Juliet’s “Hello Hello” from Elton John and Bernie Taupin was nominated for Best Original Song.

What does this mean for Oscar? I think it’s a race between Rango and Tintin with the other two or three spots wide open. But don’t be surprised if one of the 2D indies sneaks in, such as A Cat in Paris.

“To make a movie so far afield from the norm was very gratifying,” admits Hal Hickel, Rango’s animation supervisor. “It’s hard to buck the trend but we’re so thrilled to be getting such a great response. And it was a great fit for us to work in a world that had such a photographic and textured look. The freedom not to be in that live-action box was new and exciting and it was helpful having Roger Deakins come in and show us that we had all these lighting options. We looked at There Will Be Blood, and liked the solutions they came up with for those hot, dusty exteriors.

“Where do we go from here? We’re dying to do another one, with or without Gore. In fact, I’d prefer to do something else that’s completely original. We can do so much more.”

For director Chris Miller, Puss in Boots provided an opportunity to do something totally different from the Shrek world and was a liberating experience. “It’s reflected in the movie,” Miller adds. “Guillermo [del Toro] came aboard at a great time for us. It was fated in a way. It was surreal when he asked to participate and helped us achieve the story we wanted to tell. We’ll see if there’s an appetite for the cat to come back.”

“I’m just delighted that the brilliant craftsmanship, hard work, and dedication of the team who made Arthur Christmas has been honored by a Golden Globe nomination,” remarks director Sarah Smith. “Thank you to the HFPA; we hope the movie gives Christmas pleasure!”

The Golden Globes will air live on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012 at 5:00 pm PST on NBC.

Letteri Talks Tintin at Autodesk Screening

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Clips, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

At Tuesday night’s Autodesk screening of The Adventures of Tintin (Dec. 21) at the Landmark in LA, senior visual effects supervisor Joe Letteri admitted there’s no escaping the Uncanny Valley. The key, he told host David Morin, is to make sure that you get all the details right on the face to overcome any creepiness. That was the secret to Weta’s success. They leveraged the Avatar technology but improved the lighting to handle all the indoor scenes.

Speaking of lighting, when asked why director Steven Spielberg took a lighting consultant credit, Letteri said it was probably in keeping with the latest trend on animated films (Roger Deakins being the most prominent), but that there was nobody else to fill that role. However, Letteri revealed that Spielberg drove the lighting. At first, they were going to emulate the brightly-colored style of Hergé throughout, but Spielberg found it too flat-looking so he decided on a film noir look for interiors and nighttime scenes.

Meanwhile, the bravura two-and-a-half minute motorcycle chase in Morocco occurred as a result of the previs offering so many long master shots that Spielberg decided to utilize one in the film.

Snowy, the dog, proved challenging because of his white, curly fur and trying to maintain the spirit of Hergé’s odd design for the terrier. Weta used Maya and nCloth and Spielberg made sure that Snowy stole every scene he was in.

When asked if animation and VFX are converging, Letteri pointed to the screen and indicated that Tintin’s the proof.

And for those wondering why Tintin didn’t make the Academy’s list of 15 VFX Oscar contenders, Letteri said it didn’t help that several members of the Visual Effects Branch Executive committee have yet to see it. On the other hand, no animated entries made the cut, so there continues to be a bias against animation or a hard-to-classify hybrid such as Tintin.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=op3w_ICK4us&feature=player_embedded#!

Apes Rises on Blu-ray

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Animation, Blu-ray, Clips, Home Entertainment, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Rise of the Planet of the Apes, one of the surprise hits of the year as well as a surprisingly terrific reboot (it’s made quite a few 10 Best lists), arrives this week on Blu-ray (Twentieth Century Fox Home Ent.). Weta Digital and Andy Serkis combine to make Caesar an extraordinary achievement in digital acting. It’s the favorite to take the VFX Oscar, and I call Serkis “The Man of a Thousand Digital Faces” in my TOH column at Indiewire. Fox is rightly giving him a best supporting actor Oscar campaign, though he’s clearly the heart and soul of the movie, directed by Rupert Wyatt.

Rise is certainly a reference quality Blu-ray; it looks sharp and sounds thunderous (sound editing/effects are also Oscar contenders) with lots of bonus feature that I haven’t had time to check out yet. For instance, there are 11 deleted scenes and I’m hoping the death of Franco’s scientist is among them, along with several featurettes such as “Breaking Motion Capture Boundaries,” “The Genius of Andy Serkis,” and “A New Generation of Apes.”

“We rewrote skin, muscles, fur, and eyes one more time to do them a little bit better,” admits Joe Letteri, Weta’s senior visual effects supervisor, who also oversaw The Adventures of Tintin. “But I think making the performance look as realistic as possible is still the main thing that we accomplished.”

Weta placed the performance capture actors out on location or on set with the other actors. Rather than using reflective optical markers for motion tracking, they developed an active LED system with infrared lighting that allowed Weta to  work in a variety of conditions and match the cinematography.

Weta also developed a new facial muscle system still in progress that delivers better capture and animation, particularly for secondary motion. “It’s a problem that’s not easily understood because the facial muscles don’t behave like the other muscles in the body,” Letteri adds. “They are not so bound by the skeleton. But on a face they’re moving other muscles around and other tissue, and there are deep embedded layers that have an impact on what kind of shape they do, which is really complex and why in the end we wind up sculpting a lot of these things.”

They made Caesar more human because they wanted him to look a little more intelligent than the rest of the apes and to stand out among them. “You could see it in his eyes: we made the irises a little smaller so you get a better idea where he’s looking; the muzzle is slightly smaller; and the forehead is shaped a little bit more like a human’s.”

The shock of recognition in Caesar’s eyes when he realizes how and why he must lead the revolt is Letteri’s favorite moment. To achieve this Weta made a new model that more realistically captures movement in and around the eyes and how they are affected by different lighting conditions.

They’ve signed Serkis to continue his Caesar pantomime, and I can’t wait to see how they evolve the story in the sequel, as it eventually dovetails into the original’s time-warp journey with Taylor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YyMqmDeoxI

15 Compete for VFX Oscar Race

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Movies, Oscar, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | 1 Comment

The list of films qualifying for the VFX Oscar has been narrowed to 15. Not too many surprises. All of the usual suspects are there, with the likely contenders consisting of Captain America: The First Avenger, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, Hugo, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Transformers: Dark of the Moon.

The Tree of Life happily made the cut for its spectacular birth of the universe sequence, yet Anonymous did not for its superb virtual recreation of Elizabethan London. Also, The Adventures of Tintin was overlooked. Then again, it’s competing in the animation race, which was probably a major factor.

The films are listed below in alphabetical order:

  • “Captain America: The First Avenger”
  • “Cowboys & Aliens”
  • “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2″
  • “Hugo”
  • “Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol”
  • “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides”
  • “Real Steel”
  • “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”
  • “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows”
  • “Sucker Punch”
  • “Super 8″
  • “Thor”
  • “Transformers: Dark of the Moon”
  • “The Tree of Life”
  • “X-Men: First Class”

In early January, the members of the Academy’s Visual Effects Branch Executive committee, who selected the 15 films, will narrow the list to 10.

All members of the Visual Effects Branch will be invited to the annual bakeoff to view 10-minute excerpts from each of the 10 shortlisted films on Thursday, Jan. 19.  Following the screenings, the members will vote to nominate five films for final Oscar consideration.

The 84th Academy Awards nominations will be announced live on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, at 5:30 a.m. PT in the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater.

Academy Awards for outstanding film achievements of 2011 will be presented on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012, at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center, and televised live by ABC.  The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries worldwide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrIiYSdEe4E

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8vdXRLBpmI

Kung Fu Panda 2 Leads Annie Noms

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Annies, Events, Movies, performance capture, Shorts, stop-motion, Tech, VFX, Videogames, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Well, how fitting that on the same day that I spoke with Jennifer Yuh Nelson about directing Kung Fu Panda 2, that the DreamWorks sequel wound up leading the pack of Annie nominees with 12. And, with Puss in Boots grabbing nine (tied for second with Paramount’s Rango), it was a very good day for DreamWorks. Of course, we’ll have to wait and see what the impact will be on Oscar voting, but, for now, Yuh Nelson can bask in the glory of more epic and exotic Po.

“We are really excited about the expanded list of nominations this year…in all 28 categories,” said Frank Gladstone, president, ASIFA-Hollywood.  “All of the major animation studios are represented, as are some of the independent productions from Europe and South America. This certainly is a testament to the wide reach and appeal of animation and the people who create it.”

Special juried awards honoring career achievement and exceptional contributions to animation will also be awarded: Winsor McCay Award — Walt Peregoy, Borge Ring, and Ronald Searle for career contributions to the art of animation; June Foray Award — Art Leonardi for significant and benevolent or charitable impact on the art and industry of animation; and Special Achievement Award is given to an individual, individuals or a company for unique and outstanding achievement falling within the Annie Award eligibility period and not recognized within the existing award category structure. This year’s Special Achievement goes to Depth Analysis.

The 2011 Annie Award winners will be announced at the 39th Annual Annie Awards ceremony on Saturday, Feb. 4, 2012, at UCLA’s Royce Hall. For more info, please visit www.annieawards.org.

Here is the complete list of nominees:

Best Animated Feature

  • A Cat in Paris – Folimage
  • Arrugas (Wrinkles) – Perro Verde Films, S.L.
  • Arthur Christmas – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Cars 2 – Pixar Animation Studios
  • Chico & Rita – Chico & Rita Distribution Limited
  • Kung Fu Panda 2 – DreamWorks Animation
  • Puss In Boots – DreamWorks Animation
  • Rango – Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Production
  • Rio – Blue Sky Studios
  • Tintin – Amblin Entertainment, Wingnut Films and Kennedy/Marshall

Annie Award for Best Animated Special Production

  • Adventure Time: Thank You – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Batman: Year One – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Ice Age: A Mammoth Christmas – Blue Sky Studios
  • Kung Fu Panda – Secrets of the Masters – DreamWorks Animation
  • Prey 2 – Blur Studio
  • Star Tours – Industrial Light & Magic

Best Animated Short Subject

  • Adam and Dog – Lodge Films
  • I Tawt I Taw A Puddy Tat – Warner Bros. Animation
  • La Luna – Pixar Animation Studios
  • (Notes on) Biology – Ornana Films
  • Paths of Hate – Platige Image
  • Sunday – National Film Board of Canada
  • The Ballad of Nessie –Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • The Girl and the Fox – Base14
  • Wild Life – National Film Board of Canada and Studio GDS

Best Animated Television Commercial

  • Audi “Hummingbird” – The Mill
  • Geico “Foghorn” – Renegade Animation
  • McDonald’s “Apple Tree”– Duck Studios/Kompost
  • McDonald’s “Suzi Van Zoom” – Duck Studios/Kompost
  • Norton “Stuff”– Psyop
  • O2 “Niggles & Narks” –The Mill
  • Statoil “Good Night” – Studio AKA
  • “The Pirate” – Meindbender
  • Twinings “Sea” – Psyop

Best General Audience Animated TV Production

  • Archer – FX Productions
  • Green Lantern: The Animated Series – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Hoops & YoYo Ruin Christmas – Hallmark
  • MAD – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2 – Starburns Industries, Inc.
  • Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – Lucasfilm Animation, Ltd.
  • The Simpsons – Gracie Films

Best Animated Television Production – Preschool

  • Chuggington – Ludorum Pictures
  • Disney Jake and the Never Land Pirates – Disney Television Animation
  • Disney Mickey Mouse Clubhouse – Disney Television Animation
  • The WotWots Season 2 – Pukeko Pictures

Best Animated Television Production – Children

  • Fanboy and Chum Chum – Nickelodeon and Frederator
  • Kung Fu Panda – DreamWorks Animation
  • Penguins of Madagascar – DreamWorks Animation
  • The Amazing World of Gumball – Cartoon Network in Association with Dandelion Studios, Boulder Media & Studio Soi

Best Animated Video Game

  • Bumpy Road – Simogo
  • Catherine – Atlus
  • Gears of War 3 – Epic Games
  • Gesundheit – Konami Digital Entertainment
  • Ghost Trick: “Phantom Detective” – Capcom
  • Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet – Shadow Planet Productions, Gagne/Fuelcell
  • Ratchet and Clank: All 4 One – Insomniac Games
  • Rayman Origins – Ubisoft Montpellier
  • Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception – Naughty Dog

Animated Effects in an Animated Production

  • Can Yuksel “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Chase Cooper “Rango” – Industrial Light & Magic
  • Dan Lund “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Dave Tidgewell “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Eric Froemling “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios
  • Jason Mayer “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Joel Aron “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” – Lucasfilm Animation, Ltd.
  • Jon Reisch “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios
  • Kevin Romond “Tintin” – Amblin Entertainment, Wingnut Films and Kennedy/Marshall
  • Willi Geiger “Rango” – Industrial Light & Magic

Animated Effects in a Live Action Production

  • Branko Grujcic “Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides”– Industrial Light & Magic
  • Florent Andarra “Transformers: Dark of the Moon” – Industrial Light & Magic
  • Gary Wu “Cowboys & Aliens”– Industrial Light & Magic
  • Lee Uren “Cowboys & Aliens” – Industrial Light & Magic

Character Animation in a Television Production

  • Chad Sellers “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Michael Franceschi “Kung Fu Panda” – Nickelodeon
  • Rebecca Wilson Bresee “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Sihanouk Mariona “Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2” – Starburns Industries, Inc.
  • Tony Smeed “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios

Character Animation in a Feature Production

  • Andreas Deja “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Dan Wagner “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Jeff Gabor “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios
  • Mark Henn “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Olivier Staphylas “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Patrik Puhala “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios
  • Pierre Perifel “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation

Character Animation in a Live Action Production

  • Andy Arnett “HOP” – Rhythm & Hues, Illumination Entertainment
  • David Lowry “Paul” – Double Negative Visual Effects for Universal Productions/ Relativity Media/Working Title Films/Big Talk Productions
  • Eric Reynolds “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” – 20th Century Fox
  • Mike Hull “Paul” – Double Negative Visual Effects for Universal Productions/Relativity Media/Working Title Films/Big Talk Productions

Character Design in a Television Production

  • Bill Schwab “Prep & Landing” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Carl Raggio “Disney Kick Buttowski” – Disney Television Animation
  • Chad Hurd “Archer” – FX Productions
  • Chris Battle “Dan Vs.” – Starz Film Roman
  • Eric Robles “Fanboy and Chum Chum” – Nickelodeon & Frederator
  • Gordon Hammond “TUFF Puppy” – Nickelodeon
  • Mike Dougherty “TUFF Puppy” – Nickelodeon
  • Robert Ryan Cory “Secret Mountain Fort Awesome” – Cartoon Network Studios

Character Design in a Feature Production

  • Jay Shuster “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios
  • Mark “Crash” McCreery “Rango” – Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Productions
  • Patrick Mate “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Peter de Seve “Arthur Christmas” – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Sergio Pablos “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios

Directing in a Television Production

  • Brian Sheesley “Dan Vs.” – Starz Film Roman
  • Chris Savino & Clay Morrow “Disney Kick Buttowski” – Disney Television Animation
  • Dan Riba “Ben 10 Ultimate Alien” – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Duke Johnson “Community” – 23 D Films, Inc.
  • Gabe Swarr “Kung Fu Panda” – Nickelodeon
  • Ken Bruce “TUFF Puppy” – Nickelodeon
  • Kevin Deters & Stevie Wermers-Skelton “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice”– Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Matthew Nastuk “The Simpsons” – Gracie Films
  • Mic Graves & Ben Bocquelet “The Amazing World of Gumball” – Cartoon Network Europe in association with Dandelion Studios, Boulder Media & Studio Soi
  • Peter Hausner “Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu” – Wil Film
  • Steve Loter, Christo Stamboliev, Shaun Cashman, David Knott “Penguins of Madagascar” – Nickelodeon and Technicolor
  • Tony Craig “Hoops & YoYo Ruin Christmas” – Hallmark

Directing in a Feature Production

  • Carlos Saldahna “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios
  • Chris Miller “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Don Hall & Stephen Anderson “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Gore Verbinski “Rango” – Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies present a Blind Wink/GK Films Productions
  • Jennifer Yuh Nelson “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Kelly Asbury “Gnomeo & Juliet” – Touchstone Pictures

Music in a Television Production

  • Adam Berry, Bob Schooley, Mark McCorkle “Penguins of Madagascar” – Nickelodeon and Technicolor
  • Ben Locket “The Amazing World of Gumball” – Cartoon Network Europe in association with Dandelion Studios, Boulder Media & Studio Soi
  • Frederik Wiedmann “Green Lantern The Animated Series” – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Grace Potter, Michael Giacchino “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Joel McNeely, Brendan Milburn and Valerie Vigoda “Pixie Hollow Games”– DisneyToon Studios
  • Kevin Kliesch “Thundercats” – Warner Bros. Animation and Cartoon Network
  • Shawn Patterson, Zeb Wells “Robot Chicken” – ShadowMachine and Stoopid Monkey in association with Adult Swim

Music in a Feature Production

  • Henry Jackman “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • John Williams “Tintin” – Amblin Entertainment, Wingnut Films and Kennedy/Marshall
  • Mikael Mutti, Siedah Garrett, Carlinhos Brown, Sergio Mendes, John Powell, “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios
  • Zooey Deschannel, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Henry Jackman, Robert Lopez “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios

Production Design in a Television Production

  • Mark Bodner, Chris Tsirgiotis, Sue Mondt and Daniel Elson “Secret Mountain Fort Awesome” – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Peter Martin “Hoops & YoYo Ruin Christmas” – Hallmark

Production Design in a Feature Production

  • Harley Jessup “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios
  • Paul Felix “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Raymond Zilbach “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Tom Cardone, Kyle MacNaughton & Peter Chan “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios

Storyboarding in a Television Production

  • Barry W. Johnson “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Benton Connor “Regular Show” – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Brian Kesinger “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Dave Thomas “TUFF Puppy” – Nickelodeon
  • Fred Gonzalez “TUFF Puppy” – Nickelodeon
  • Joe Mateo “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Justin Nichols “Fanboy & Chum Chum” – Nickelodeon & Frederator
  • Katie Rice “Fanboy & Chum Chum”– Nickelodeon & Frederator
  • Rebecca Sugar “Adventure Time” – Cartoon Network Studios

Storyboarding in a Feature Production

  • Bob Logan “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • David Gosman “Rango” – Paramount Pictures & Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Production
  • Gary Graham “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Jeremy Spears “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Josh Hayes “Rango” – Paramount Pictures & Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Production
  • Kris Pearn “Arthur Christmas” – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Nelson Yokota “Gnomeo and Juliet” – Touchstone Pictures
  • Philip Craven “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Scott Morse “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios

Voice Acting in a Television Production

  • Carlos Alazraqui as Denzel Crocker “Fairly OddParents” – Nickelodeon
  • Dan Harmon as Jekyll “Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2” – Starburns Industries, Inc.
  • Daran Norris as Cosmo “Fairly OddParents” – Nickelodeon
  • Dee Bradley Baker as Obi-Wan “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”– Lucasfilm Animation, Ltd.
  • Diedrich Bader as Batman “Batman: The Brave and the Bold” – Warner Bros. Animation
  • H. Jon Benjamin as Sterling Archer “Archer” – FX Productions
  • Jeff Bennett as Kowalski “Penguins of Madagascar” – Nickelodeon and Technicolor
  • Jeff B. Davis as Victor Frankenstein “Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2” – Starburns Industries, Inc.
  • Jessica Walter as Malory Archer “Archer” – FX Productions
  • Judy Greer as Cheryl Tunt “Archer” – FX Productions
  • Logan Grove as Gumball “The Amazing World of Gumball” – Cartoon Network Europe in association with Dandelion Studios, Boulder Media & Studio Soi
  • Nika Futterman as Asajj Ventress “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” – Lucasfilm Animation, Ltd.
  • Scott Adsit as the Creature “Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2” – Starburns Industries, Inc.
  • Tara Strong as Timmy Turner “Fairly OddParents – Operation Dingleberg” – Nickelodeon

Voice Acting in a Feature Production

  • Ashley Jensen as Bryony “Arthur Christmas” – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Bill Nighy as Grandsanta “Arthur Christmas” – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Gary Oldman as Shen “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • James Hong as Mr. Ping “Kung Fu Panda 2” DreamWorks Animation
  • Jemaine Clement as Nigel “Rio” – Blue Sky Studios
  • Jim Cummings as Featherstone “Gnomeo and Juliet” – Touchstone Pictures
  • Zach Galifianakis as Humpty Alexander Dumpty “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation

Writing in a Television Production

  • Blake Lemons, William Reiss, C.H. Greenblatt, Derek Evanick, Diana Lafyatis, Neil Graf “Disney Fish Hooks – Fish School Musical” – Disney Television Animation
  • Carolyn Omine “The Simpsons -Treehouse of Horror XXII” – Gracie Films
  • Dani MIchaeli, Sean Charmatz, Nate Cash, Luke Brookshier, Paul Tibbitt “SpongeBob SquarePants – Patrick’s Staycation” – Nickelodeon
  • Josh Weinstein “Futurama – All The President’s Heads” – The Curiosity Company in association with 20th Century Fox Television
  • Kevin Sullivan, Will Schifrin, Ray DeLaurentis “TUFF Puppy Thunder Dog” – Nickelodeon
  • Matt Maiellaro, Dave Willis “Aqua Unit Patrol Squad 1 – The Creditor” – Williams Street Studios, Adult Swim
  • Ray DeLaurentis, Will Schifrin “Fairly OddParents “Invasion of the Dads” – Nickelodeon
  • Steve Wermers-Skelton, Kevin Deters “Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice” – Walt Disney Animation Studios

Writing in a Feature Production

  • Andy Riley, Kevin Cecil, Mark Burton, Kathy Greenburg, Emily Cook, Rob Sprackling, John R. Smith, Kelly Asbury, Steve Hamilton “Gnomeo & Juliet” – Touchstone Pictures
  • Brian Kesinger, Kendelle Hoyer, Don Dougherty, Clio Chang, Don Hall, Stephen Anderson “Winnie The Pooh” – Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • John Logan, Gore Verbinski and James Byrkit “Rango” – Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Productions
  • Sarah Smith, Peter Baynham “Arthur Christmas” – Sony Pictures Animation, Aardman Animations
  • Steve Moffat, Edgar Wright, Joe Cronish “Tintin”– Amblin Entertainment, Wingnut Films and Kennedy/Marshall

Editing in Television Production

  • Garret Elkins “Mary Shelley’s Frankenhole Season 2” – Starburn Industries, Inc.
  • Hugo Morales “Kung Fu Panda” Nickelodeon
  • Jason W.A. Tucker “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” – Lucasfilm Animation, Ltd.
  • Paul D. Calder “Futurama” – The Curiosity Company in association with 20th Century Fox Television
  • Ted Machold, Jeff Adams, Doug Tiano, Bob Tomlin “Penguins of Madagascar” – Nickelodeon and Technicolor

Editing in a Feature Production

  • Clare Knight, A.C.E. “Kung Fu Panda 2” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Craig Wood, A.C.E. “Rango” – Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies present A Blind Wink/GK Films Productions
  • Eric Dapkewicz “Puss In Boots” – DreamWorks Animation
  • Michael Kahn “Tintin”– Amblin Entertainment, Wingnut Films and Kennedy/Marshall
  • Stephen Schaffer, A.C.E. “Cars 2” – Pixar Animation Studios