Richardson Talks More Hugo

Cinematographer Bob Richardson went back to square one in shooting Hugo in 3-D. As he simultaneously studied the films of Méliès and the photographic works from that period, he began evaluating the Alexa.

“I did not attempt to measure digital capture against film capture,” he explains. “I went into this experience as producing a digital 3-D product against a fair amount voices asking for a different approach. Meaning that most prefer to use digital capture to emulate film. After speaking with Marty, we both agreed that first and foremost we were creating a 3-D experience and that would require digital cameras. Thus, whatever color space the Alexa’s provided was to be the one we worked within and to place the 2-D film presentation in a secondary position.

“Immediately I learned that one should not take one’s previous ‘film” experience and lay that flatly atop 3-D digital capture without questioning previous patterns of behavior. I realized very early on that I needed to be schooled by a master: Vince Pace was my first teacher; Rob Legato was my constant teacher and companion; and then practice brought a comfort zone.”

The next step was to determine how to take the data and manipulate it. An onsite lab and theater facility was built at Shepperton in London and Greg Fisher was hired to color correct the dailies. “Vince had his team stereo correct our dailies and Marty wanted us to develop a lut for autochrome [a red-orange, green, and blue-violet system, which the Lumière Brothers experimented with in the early 20th century in conjunction with 3-D] for the flashback sequences, which was developed by Rob Legato and Greg Fisher.

“Unfortunately, we were unable to duplicate the exact look but in the process of attempting to create an autochrome feel we came up with what is now the primary base of the film, and the [predominant] blue hue is a direct result of that lut. I found that the blue in the autochrome lut needed a base blue on set. I talked with my gaffer and we set the overhead lights that were currently tungsten with full blue gel. That was often used in combination with white light on the floor to light the actors. The autochrome picked up on the blue and shifted it toward what you see in the film. The sense of depth was enhanced by a combination of cool and warm. We tested shooting sequences with one tone and the result was not as strong a sense of depth as when we mixed cool and warm. Within the film we used that piece of knowledge to our advantage. Certain sequences went completely blue or white with no mixture. That can be seen in the second sequence between Hugo and Méliès at the toy store. A cooler base with little mix of white or warm was used.”

Aside from conveying a hyper reality with tremendous layers of depth and particulate matter that leaps off the screen, Hugo’s 3-D also brings us closer to the characters and actually influences the direction of the performances. “I agree with you completely here — the 3-D gives a sense of intimacy that is not as evident in 2-D,” Richardson suggests. “I must admit that it is somewhat of a mystery to me, why, with some, it works better than with others. I felt that Christopher Lee [as the compassionate bookstore owner] took to 3-D in a phenomenal way. His medium shots and close-ups bear his soul to the audience. The same can be said for the Ben Kingsley close-ups as Méliès in and around the toy store. When an actor is in the zone, the 3-D enhances that performance.”

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Below the Line, Cinematography, Clips, Movies, Oscar, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production

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