Getting More Immersed with Indiewire


  The Penske Media purchase of Indiewire has resulted in an expansion of my role as crafts and awards season contributor.  Beginning this week, I begin Emmy coverage of below-the-line contenders along with my usual Oscar season crafts reporting, working closely

Immersed in Blu-ray: Hitchcock and Bogart


The WB Archive Collection gets Hitch and Bogie on Blu-ray and they've never looked better for home viewing. In Kent Jones' indispensable doc, Hitchcock/Truffaut, he reminds us that Truffaut was on a mission to correct misconceptions about Hitch as a lightweight

Immersed in Books: Farber on Film


For the first time, the complete writings of film critic Manny Farber is available from Library of America, edited by Robert Polito (Savage Art: A Biography of Jim Thompson). Manny Farber (1917-2008) was the first modernist film critic to write like a modernist.

Trailering Twixt

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Movies, Tech | Leave a comment

Following his eventful Comic-Con presentation, Francis Ford Coppola has launched the trailer for Twixt, his Cormanesque goth movie about tormented writer Val Kilmer tripping out with vampires in a seedy town. Capturing both a real and artificial look (thanks to digitally shooting live like a concert and editing on the fly in real-time), Coppola one ups his One From the Heart “electronic” experiment as well as his Rumble Fish music video and retro Dracula adventures. Hounded by an artistic mid-life crisis, Kilmer implodes in a cry for help. He’s haunted in his dreams by spirits (including Poe), and he’s seduced by Dern into collaborating on a book about a local serial killer.

The more things change, the more they stay the same, as the saying goes.

Trailering Like Crazy

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Below the Line, Movies, Tech, Trailers | Leave a comment

Paramount Vantage has released the trailer for Drake Doremus’ indie sensation Like Crazy (Oct. 28), which nabbed the Sundance Dramatic Grand Jury Prize. As Anne Thompson relates in her informative interview with the director today at TOH, Like Crazy is a romantically voyeuristic adventure. Using the Canon 7 Digital SLR camera (photographed by John Guleserian), he captures an improvisational vibe inspired by jazz and the naturalism of Lars von Trier. Judging by the trailer, Anton Yelchin and Felicity Jones (The Tempest) are achingly sublime in their intimacy (it has been trimmed to PG-13 by Doremus). At first blush, Like Crazy harkens all the way back to Murnau and Borzage, for starters, yet it’s totally fresh in its post-modern take on first love, in which Brit college student Jones falls for American classmate Yelchin, only to be separated when she violates the terms of her visa. Immersive mise en scène comes in many forms, thankfully.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnFKe9eWVMw

Trailering Happy Feet 2

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Movies, Shorts, Tech | Leave a comment

The sequel to George Miller’s Oscar-winning Happy Feet has a new trailer and it looks as snappy and toe-tapping as you’d expect, along with even richer and much finer-detailed animation from Dr. D Studios in Sydney, under the supervision of former ILM vet Rob Coleman. In this one, Mumble’s (Elijah Wood) son Erik (Elizabeth Daily) who’s afraid to dance, and challenged by The Mighty Sven (Hank Azaria), who can fly. Meanwhile, the penguin world is shaken to its core and all the competing factions must come together to save their world. Matt Damon and Brad Pitt lend their voices to the tiny Krills. Happy Feet 2 opens Nov. 18 through Warner Bros (in 3-D, of course) with the Looney Tunes short, Daffy’s Rhapsody.

More Spielberg and Jackson on Tintin at IndieWIRE

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Movies, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

I’ve just posted more extensive Tintin coverage from my trip to Weta last week at IndieWIRE’s TOH. There will be more coverage to come from Weta about both Tintin and Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

Favreau and Craig Talk Return of ‘Classic’ Bond

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Books, James Bond, Movies, VFX | Leave a comment

Director Jon Favreau had fun chatting with his Cowboys & Aliens star Daniel Craig about Bond 23, which begins production in November (with India confirmed as a primary location) and opens Nov. 9, 2012. Craig was naturally coy about details, but admitted that it would contain some classic Bond elements (Naomie Harris is supposed to introduce Moneypenny) and had high praise for director Sam Mendes (Road to Perdition).

“It’s a great choice because Sam has a fervor and energy to really direct a Bond movie with a capital B,” Craig enthused. “He’s read every book and just soaked up everything about it. I read the script the other day and I’m more excited about this than I was about Casino.”

Favreau admitted that he filled the gadget void with Iron Man given Craig’s grittier, more realistic reboot. Craig said that gadgets pose a challenge for Bond because they’re so ubiquitous today and that it’s harder to find something unique unless you have access to classified military hardware and equipment.

In terms of humor, Craig also suggested that less is definitely more with his Bond. In my first interview with Craig, he professed an affinity for gallows humor, which served him well as a defense mechanism in Casino Royale, so we can probably expect a continuation of this dry wit.

In fact, the highlight of the conversation was a discussion about how Austin Powers has helped kill the self-reverential Bond in this post-modern era. “It’s been killed because now you can’t wink at it — he’s double-winked,” Craig offered. “It’s like a bird that flies in smaller and smaller circles until it flies up its own ass,” Favreau quipped. It just makes it all the more challenging to layer in humor that’s organic to the character and situation.

Indeed, Bond has always been a delicate balancing act between danger and humor, trying something new and going to extremes and then switching gears and repeating the cycle. I’m smack in the middle of this right now with the chapter on Moonraker in my Bond book. So it’ll be fascinating to see how Craig continues to bring Bond full-circle back to Fleming, while at the same time being true to the franchise.

Meanwhile, Peter Caranicas of Variety reports that Steve Begg (Casino Royale) has signed on to Bond 23 as visual effects supervisor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pw7i82JUaw

Trailering Red Tails

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Animation, Movies, Tech, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Great aerial action from ILM (supervised by Super 8′s Russell Earl) underscores Red Tails, exec produced by George Lucas, about the The Tuskegee Airmen: the first African-American fighter pilots in U.S. military history that helped turn the momentum in Europe during World War II. The Lucasfilm Ltd. production will launch on Jan. 20, 2012, from Twentieth Century Fox, directed by Anthony Hemingway (Treme, The Wire, Battlestar Galactica), and produced by Rick McCallum and Charles Floyd Johnson.

Red Tails stars Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard, Bryan Cranston, Nate Parker, David Oyelowo (Rise of the Planet of the Apes), Tristan Wilds, Cliff Smith aka Method Man, Kevin Phillips, Rick Otto, Lee Tergesen Andre Royo, Ne-Yo, Elijah Kelley, Marcus T. Paulk, Leslie Odom Jr., Michael B. Jordan, and Daniela Ruah.

“I’ve wanted to do this film for a great many years,” said Lucas. “So it is especially gratifying to see it all come together. It has been a real pleasure to work with Anthony and the extraordinary cast on a project that we all passionately believe in. The Tuskegee Airmen were such superb pilots that it was essential for us to create visual effects that would live up to their heroism and put audiences in the cockpit with them. They were only in their early 20s when they performed these amazing feats,” Lucas added.  “They became the best of the best—the top guns. It is an honor to bring to the screen a story inspired by their heroics.”

Trailering Battleship

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Animation, Movies, Tech, VFX | Leave a comment

Universal’s Battleship (May 18, 2012) looks like Pearl Harbor meets Transformers. Director Peter Berg (Hancock) has taken the classic Hasbro naval combat game and mashed it up with sci-fi. An alien race known as The Regents comes to Earth to build a power source in the ocean. Battleship stars Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgård, Brooklyn Decker, Rihanna, and Liam Neeson. Lots of skln from Decker and metallic alien mayhem from ILM (supervised by Pablo Helman), which takes Transformers to the next level.

Spielberg and Jackson Show More Tintin at Weta

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Movies, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

I attended a special Tintin press visit earlier this week at Weta in Wellington, New Zealand, where Steven Spielberg (via polycom) and Peter Jackson showed an exclusive sneak peek of a thrilling seaplane chase in 3-D that included the first mix from John Williams’ rousing score.

It’s a frantic and funny scene that typifies the tone of the film, capturing the essence of Herge’s illustrative style and slapstick humor along with Spielberg’s iconic cinematic signature. While Tintin (Jamie Bell) attempts to pilot a seaplane in the rain pursued by baddies, a nervous Captain Haddock (Andy Serkis) attempts to grab a bottle of Scotch (whose contents hardens), and then winds up climbing outside to burp into the engine when they run out of fuel.

We also saw the same reel shown at Comic-Con containing lots of action and some exposition between the intrepid Tintin and cantankerous Haddock (an Odd Couple, according to Jackson). Judging from the footage this looks like the best performance captured film yet, utilizing the latest Weta advances in facial modeling and subsurface scattering. Indeed, we saw a presentation on how they use silicon facial casts to achieve finer detail through displacement maps and painting in Mari.

During a Q&A afterward, Spielberg explained that it was a “crazy and very worthwhile learning cure.” He told me that “it all gets down to the basics: story, plot, narrative, and characters, especially with the Herge books… to exonerate these characters in a way that if Herge were with us, he could look up at the screen and say, ‘Yep, that looks like Captain Haddock to me.’”

Spielberg also said that he shot The Adventures of Tintin (Dec. 23) like a conventional movie. In fact, it reminded him of using a Super 8 Kodak camera during his youth. “I was running around with a PlayStation controller with a 6″ monitor in between the handles,” he added. “I had all the x/y buttons on my right and I could crane up and down, I could dolly in, dolly out; I could basically be the focus puller, the camera operator, the dolly grip. I wound up lighting the movie with some of the artists at Weta. And so I did a lot of jobs I don’t normally do myself on a movie, and it gave me the chance to actually start to see the picture cut together.”

By getting into the volume with the actors, he was able to bring a conventional wisdom to the set each day (he shot in sequence for 32 days in LA), and maintain objectivity nearly two years later when he was able to tweak camera, lighting, atmospherics, and expressions to emphasize different story points.

Afterward, Jackson gave us a tour of the MoCap stage at Weta, using a slightly different virtual mockup camera than the wheel controller made for James Cameron that Spielberg used. Jackson was absolutely giddy, shooting his two performance capture actors in the volume. All the assets are built in advance so the director can compose shots while viewing low-res versions of the animated characters in their CG environments. Here’s hoping that Jackson gets the chance to direct the next one. He’s still open about which book to adapt, but promises a little more from The Crab with the Golden Claws and Red Rackham’s Treasure.

Source Code Goes Blu

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Home Entertainment, Movies, VFX | Leave a comment

Source Code (on Blu-ray July 26th from Summit Ent.) proves that Moon was no fluke. Duncan Jones follows his brilliant debut with a more conventional sci-fi thriller, yet Source Code is just as trippy and existential, and even more gripping. Jake Gyllenhaal stars as a mysterious soldier transported to a Chicago commuter after it’s exploded as part of a secret military project. It’s part Ground Hog Day and part Twilight Zone. Gyllenhaal takes the guise of one of the commuter passengers, and races against time in continual eight-minute loops to identify the bomber before he can strike again, piecing together the puzzle on the train as well as his own strange circumstances. In fact, Source Code turns into a fascinating love triangle involving one of the passengers (Michelle Monaghan) that humanizes him and the military liaison  (Vera Farmiga) that guides him on his journey. It’s a sublime time travel story about destiny.

The subdued color palette from cinematographer Don Burgess comes across effectively on Blu-ray, and the CG environments and digital doubles principally handled by Modus FX seamlessly blend together without notice.

Serkis Talks Performance Capture

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Animation, Movies, performance capture, Tech, Trailers, VFX | Leave a comment

I have an interview today with  Andy Serkis at IndieWIRE’s TOH about his recent performance capture experiences on Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Tintin, and The Hobbit. I’m actually in New Zealand this week to visit the Wizards of Weta and find out more about Tintin especially. So there will be plenty to discuss very soon.