Getting More Immersed with Indiewire


  The Penske Media purchase of Indiewire has resulted in an expansion of my role as crafts and awards season contributor.  Beginning this week, I begin Emmy coverage of below-the-line contenders along with my usual Oscar season crafts reporting, working closely

Immersed in Blu-ray: Hitchcock and Bogart


The WB Archive Collection gets Hitch and Bogie on Blu-ray and they've never looked better for home viewing. In Kent Jones' indispensable doc, Hitchcock/Truffaut, he reminds us that Truffaut was on a mission to correct misconceptions about Hitch as a lightweight

Immersed in Books: Farber on Film


For the first time, the complete writings of film critic Manny Farber is available from Library of America, edited by Robert Polito (Savage Art: A Biography of Jim Thompson). Manny Farber (1917-2008) was the first modernist film critic to write like a modernist.

Virtual Production

Peter Jackson Unveils Hobbit #3 Production Diary

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Books, Movies, Tech, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Peter Jackson is unable to make Comic-Con this weekend to show off The Hobbit: The Unexpected Journey, writing on Facebook that the timing is too premature, but anticipates making an appearance next year. However, yesterday he launched the third video production diary for The Hobbit. You can view all three below. Meanwhile, here’s a new image of the dwarves. Speaking of which, I chatted with motion choreographer Terry Notary (The Hobbit, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Avatar), and he confirmed that there will be plenty of CG performance-captured characters, including dwarves, elves, goblins, wargs, and orcs. In fact, he teased that the goblins will be quadrupeds with arm extensions and will move in a unique style. You can look forward to reading about insights into his fascinating craft. The Unexpected Journey opens Dec. 14, 2012.

Amazing Spider-Man Trailer Leaked

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Animation, Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Sony’s The Amazing Spider-Man trailer has been leaked (originally sourced at movie-list.com) ahead of its Comic-Con premiere in Hall H this weekend. Director Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer) has definitely slinged a nerdier and creepier reboot with Social Network’s Andrew Garfield in a Zuckerberg-like reversal of iconoclastic empowerment. Co-starring Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Martin Sheen, Sally Field, and Dennis Leary. VFX looks more low-key as well, but Sony Imageworks will certainly make use of new HDRI advances with the Spheron digital camera for quicker and superior integration of CG environments. Coming July 3, 2012.

 

Captain America Sets the Table for The Avengers

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

Marvel saved one of the best for last with Captain America in setting up The Avengers (May 4, 2012). And Joe Johnston returns to form, channeling The Rocketeer as well as October Sky, with his affectionate comic book rendering of World War II occultist megalomania and mayhem. Yes, it evokes Raiders of the Lost Ark, but without the tongue-in-cheek irony that made Steven Spielberg’s serial adventure so unique 30 years ago (as IndieWIRE’s Anne Thompson rightly points out). But when Joss Whedon rolls out The Avengers, the dynamics should work out just fine with earnest, patriotic Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) complementing the snarky Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.).

So, just when superhero fatigue was setting in, Captain America: First Avenger blows in like a breath of fresh air like a real movie and not just a Marvel franchise. Scrawny, orphaned, Rogers just wants a chance to join the fight against the bullies, and gets his chance with some superhero juice that does the trick better than spinach, going up against Teutonic master of delusion Red Skull (the ever reliable Hugo Weaving), who’s found his own supernatural Lost Ark with which to rule the world. The VFX (overseen by Chris Townsend) is seamless and unobtrusive; in fact, this doesn’t seem overly vfxy at all, despite more than a dozen vendors involved. However, the 3-D conversion leaves much to be desired and turns out to be more distracting than enhancing. Now we have to wait and see how this all plays out with The Avengers next summer, with the members of S.H.I.E.L.D. fitting into place and Thor’s Loki (Tom Hiddleston) going after the MacGuffin for world domination.

Trailering The Dark Knight Rises

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

How does Bruce Wayne regain his humanity before he’s completely swallowed up by his Batman legend? A more immersive Gotham (spearheaded by VFX supervisor Paul Franklin and assisted by IMAX, no doubt); the tug of war for Wayne’s soul between Liam Neeson’s Ra’s al Ghul and Gary Oldman’s Commissioner Gordon. The eerie image of Tom Hardy’s Bane, but no allusion just yet to Anne Hathaway’s Selina Kyle/Catwoman. What a contrast to Potter. But then Christopher Nolan plays in a whole other cinematic sandbox. Coming July 20, 2012.

Trailering Hugo

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Books, Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

The Hugo teaser trailer is now available (shortened from Hugo Cabret and opening Nov. 23). It’s immediately clear that it’s Martin Scorsese’s valentine to French cinema, particularly Georges Melies (Ben Kingsley), the father of special effects. He soaks up the period with steam trains and mechanical gizmos.”It’s Neverland and Oz and Treasure Island all wrapped into one.” The director/cinephile’s first foray into 3-D and children’s wonder is surely a holiday must-see.

An adaptation of Brian Selznick’s bestseller about an orphan boy (Asa Butterfield) living a secret life in the walls of a Paris train station in the 1930s and a mysterious encounter with Melies. Scorsese told The Guardian: “Every shot is rethinking cinema, rethinking narrative — how to tell a story with a picture. Now, I’m not saying we have to keep throwing javelins at the camera, I’m not saying we use it as a gimmick, but it’s liberating. It’s literally a Rubik’s Cube every time you go out to design a shot, and work out a camera move, or a crane move. But it has a beauty to it also. People look like… like moving statues. They move like sculpture, as if sculpture is moving in a way. Like dancers…”

Rob Legato serves as overall supervisor; Pixomondo LA is the lead vendor. He told me a while back that “the Melies recreations are stunning-looking. In some cases impossible for the trained eye to see what might have been restored from what was recreated. First choice, of course, is restoration but we have recreated some moments and the behind-the-scenes shooting of the same. We recreated the glass house studio and the painted backdrops and fantastic costumes. A treat for film lovers.”

Trailering Tintin and Discussing Oscar

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in 3-D, Animation, Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX, Virtual Production | Leave a comment

There’s a new trailer for Steven Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (Dec. 23), which reveals more of the performance capture animation and hyper-real world, adding fuel to the fire that the stylized effort to bring Hergé’s popular characters to life is worthy of Oscar consideration.

Spielberg intends on qualifying Tintin in the animated feature category, even though the Motion Picture Academy has stiffened the rules by proclaiming that performance capture in and of itself is not considered animation. However, as I understand it, the rules are more nuanced: As long as the characters are not replicas of the actors (Daniel Craig, Simon Pegg, Jamie Bell, and Andy Serkis) driving the performances — which clearly they are not — and there is a team of animators shaping the look and crafting the performances in this full-CG world, then it should qualify. And, remember, there is already precedent: The Robert Zemeckis-produced Monster House was nominated in 2007.

However, Tintin has already become a lightning rod among traditionalists, as witnessed by a recent commentary in the Los Angeles Times. But, in light of Andy Serkis’ contention last Thursday during a CalTech discussion of Rise of the Planet of the Apes that performance capture is both actor-driven and collaboratively animated, the debate will surely continue.

Meanwhile, Anne Thompson and Kris Tapley cover the issue as well in their mid-summer Oscar Talk.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqn_rjQudps