A Dangerous Method Dissected

There’s an interesting irony that the very week Citizen Kane bowed on Blu-ray, David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method (Nov. 23) took some early critical hits for being uncinematic. Just because it’s theatrical and talky and visually spare? Some Came Running’s Glenn Kenny hit back with some very persuasive aesthetic arguments about the power of Cronenberg’s visual style and how it serves as a compelling counterpoint to the rivalry between Michael Fassbender’s romantic Carl Jung and Viggo Mortensen’s rigorous Sigmund Freud.

It just so happens that I attended a screening a couple of weeks ago, and I was particularly struck by the strong visual style. As Kenny points out, for instance, the depiction of the initial treatment of Keira Knightley’s tortured Sabina Spielrein is brilliantly constructed. Jung insists on sitting behind Sabina as she attempts to describe what’s troubling her in an attempt to remain unobtrusive and detached. And as she recounts her sexual repression and compulsion for S&M, her face and body contort as though she were possessed by the devil. All the while, the two-shot and closeups reveal an attraction/repulsion that will develop between Jung and Sabina.

Meanwhile, screenwriter Christopher Hampton told F.X. Feeney during a Q&A how rigorous a director Cronenberg is and how much he’s learned from his narrative skill (which can’t be divorced from his visual style). I look forward to exploring this and more in greater detail as we get closer to the film’s release because it’s such a rich cinematic experience.

Posted on by Bill Desowitz in Below the Line, Books, Movies, Tech, Trailers, VFX

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